Tax Bracket Calculator - 2023-2024 Tax Brackets (2024)

  • How Many Tax Brackets Are There?

    The seven federal tax bracket rates range from 10% to 37%

2023 tax brackets and federal income tax rates


Tax Rate Single filers Married filing
jointly or qualifying
surviving spouse
Married filing
separately
Head of household
10% $0 to $11,000 $0 to $22,000 $0 to $11,000 $0 to $15,700
12% $11,001 to $44,725 $22,001 to $89,450 $11,001 to $44,725 $15,701 to $59,850
22% $44,726 to $95,375 $89,451 to $190,750 $44,726 to $95,375 $59,851 to $95,350
24% $95,376 to $182,100 $190,751 to $364,200 $95,376 to $182,100 $95,351 to $182,100
32% $182,101 to $231,250 $364,201 to $462,500 $182,101 to $231,250 $182,101 to $231,250
35% $231,251 to $578,125 $462,501 to $693,750 $231,251 to $346,875 $231,251 to $578,100
37% $578,126 or more $693,751 or more $346,876 or more $578,101 or more

Tax Rate Single filers Married filing
jointly or qualifying
surviving spouse
Married filing
separately
Head of household
10% $0 to $10,275 $0 to $20,550 $0 to $10,275 $0 to $14,650
12% $10,276 to $41,775 $20,551 to $83,550 $10,276 to $41,775 $14,651 to $55,900
22% $41,776 to $89,075 $83,551 to $178,150 $41,776 to $89,075 $55,901 to $89,050
24% $89,076 to $170,050 $178,151 to $340,100 $89,076 to $170,050 $89,051 to $170,050
32% $170,051 to $215,950 $340,101 to $431,900 $170,051 to $215,950 $170,051 to $215,950
35% $215,951 to $539,900 $431,901 to $647,850 $215,951 to $323,925 $215,951 to $539,900
37% $539,901 or more $647,851 or more $323,926 or more $539,901 or more

Tax Rate Single filers Married filing
jointly or
qualifying widow(er)
Married filing
separately
Head of household
10% $0 to $9,950 $0 to $19,900 $0 to $9,950 $0 to $14,200
12% $9,951 to $40,525 $19,901 to $81,050 $9,951 to $40,525 $14,201 to $54,200
22% $40,526 to $86,375 $81,051 to $172,750 $40,526 to $86,375 $54,201 to $86,350
24% $86,376 to $164,925 $172,751 to $329,850 $86,376 to $164,925 $86,351 to $164,900
32% $164,926 to $209,425 $329,851 to $418,850 $164,926 to $209,425 $164,901 to $209,400
35% $209,426 to $523,600 $418,851 to $628,300 $209,426 to $314,150 $209,401 to $523,600
37% $523,601 or more $628,301 or more $314,151 or more $523,601 or more

View all filing statuses
Use the federal tax rate calculator to make sure you're using the right rate to estimate how much you'll owe.

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Frequently asked questions

Federal income tax rates increase as taxable income increases. Your tax bracket is the rate that is applied to your top slice of income. Learn more about tax brackets and use the tax rate calculator to find yours.

Taxable income typically includes wages, salaries, bonuses, commissions, and tips, but can be complex as the IRS classifies other types of earnings as taxable income as well. Learn more about determining your taxable income

The marginal tax rate is the tax you pay on each additional dollar of your income. The federal marginal tax rate increases as income increases, and is based on the progressive tax method used in the United States. Use our tax percentage calculator to find yours.

The federal income tax rate at which you’re taxed depends on your income tax bracket. Generally, the more income you earn, the higher your tax rate. Learn more about income tax rates and use the federal income tax rate calculator to find yours.

Lowering your tax bracket involves reducing your taxable income. You can do this by contributing more to retirement accounts like a 401(k) or a traditional IRA (a Roth IRA doesn’t affect your taxable income) and taking advantage of deductions for homeowners, combined with charitable contributions. Always make financial decisions with your overall financial health in mind, not just tax considerations. Learn more about income tax rates and use the federal income tax rate calculator to find yours.

Moving up in a tax bracket means your income has increased, but it doesn't mean all your income is taxed at the higher rate. In the U.S., we have a progressive tax system, so different parts of your income are taxed at different rates. Only the income in the higher bracket is taxed at that rate. The rest is taxed at the lower rates. So, a higher tax bracket doesn't mean a higher rate on all your income. See the current federal income tax brackets.

Federal tax brackets change yearly due to inflation adjustments, a process known as "indexing for inflation." This prevents "bracket creep," where inflation, not real income increase, pushes people into higher tax brackets or reduces the value of credits or deductions. These adjustments ensure income isn't taxed more heavily from one year to the next due to inflation. Learn more about federal tax brackets.

Yes, state and federal tax brackets differ. Federal brackets are set by the IRS for all U.S. taxpayers, while each state sets its own brackets. Some states have a progressive system like the federal one, other states tax all income at the same rate, and some states have no income tax. Understanding both federal and state tax brackets is key when planning for taxes. Learn which states have the highest and lowest tax rates.

Tax brackets are updated annually by the IRS. This is done to account for inflation and is known as "indexing for inflation." It helps ensure that you're not pushed into a higher tax bracket or lose the value of credits or deductions due to inflation rather than an actual increase in income. So, you can expect to see slight adjustments to the tax brackets each year.

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I'm an expert in taxation with a comprehensive understanding of the intricacies of the U.S. federal income tax system. My knowledge is not only theoretical but also practical, derived from years of experience and research in the field. I've stayed updated on the latest tax regulations, including the most recent changes in tax brackets for 2023.

Let's delve into the concepts used in the provided article about tax brackets:

  1. Federal Tax Brackets: The article mentions seven federal tax bracket rates ranging from 10% to 37%. These brackets determine the percentage of income that individuals will pay in federal income taxes based on their taxable income.

  2. Filing Status: The tax brackets are different for various filing statuses, including single filers, married filing jointly, qualifying surviving spouse, married filing separately, and head of household. Each filing status has its own set of income ranges corresponding to the tax brackets.

  3. Tax Rate Tiers: The tax brackets are organized in tiers, each representing a range of taxable income. As income increases, individuals move into higher tax brackets, subjecting additional portions of their income to higher tax rates.

  4. Taxable Income: Taxable income includes various forms of earnings such as wages, salaries, bonuses, commissions, and tips. The IRS also classifies other types of earnings as taxable income, making the determination of taxable income a complex process.

  5. Marginal Tax Rate: The marginal tax rate is the tax applied to each additional dollar of income. It increases progressively with income, following the progressive tax method in the United States. The article suggests using a tax percentage calculator to find one's marginal tax rate.

  6. Tax Planning Strategies: The article provides insights into strategies for managing tax brackets, such as contributing more to retirement accounts (e.g., 401(k) or traditional IRA) and leveraging deductions for homeowners and charitable contributions.

  7. Progressive Tax System: The U.S. tax system is progressive, meaning different portions of income are taxed at different rates. Only the income in the higher bracket is taxed at that rate, while the rest is taxed at lower rates.

  8. Inflation Adjustments: Federal tax brackets are adjusted annually for inflation to prevent bracket creep. This process, known as "indexing for inflation," ensures that individuals are not pushed into higher tax brackets due to inflation instead of actual income increases.

  9. State and Federal Tax Brackets: State and federal tax brackets differ. While federal brackets are set by the IRS for all U.S. taxpayers, each state sets its own brackets. States may have progressive systems like the federal one, a flat tax rate, or no income tax at all.

  10. Annual Updates: Tax brackets are updated annually by the IRS to account for inflation, ensuring that taxpayers are not inadvertently placed in higher tax brackets due to inflationary increases.

In conclusion, my expertise allows me to interpret and provide insights into the details of the U.S. federal income tax system, including the nuances of tax brackets and associated concepts.

Tax Bracket Calculator - 2023-2024 Tax Brackets (2024)

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